Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Ayers Postman Rang 18 to 20 Times

Allen Hulton, a retired U.S. Postal Service letter carrier delivered mail to the Chicago suburb home of Tom and Mary Ayers, the parents of self-admitted terror-bomber Bill Ayers, in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It was in the Chicago home of Bill Ayers that Barack Obama launched his 2008 presidential campaign and later described Bill Ayers as 'just a guy in the neighborhood'. In a sworn affidavit to investigators of Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona to determine if Barack Hussein Obama is eligible to campaign in Arizona for the office of US President in 2012, postman Allen Hulton maintains it was Tom and Mary Ayers who paid for Obama's university education and that he (Hulton) met and spoke with Obama outside the Ayers homes.


Hulton recorded about 3 hours of interviews in which he states that he delivered mail to the home of Tom and Mary Ayers and spoke with Mary Ayers 18-20 times during the late 1980s and early 1990s and once with Tom Ayers, both of whom are deceased.

Hulton says during a recording session,
“One day, Mary came to the door when I came up to the house with the mail. After a greeting, she started enthusiastically talking to me about this young black student they were helping out, and she referred to him as a foreign student.”

“I was taken aback by how enthusiastic she was about him,” Hulton says. “And I believe she said he was from either Kenya or Indonesia, and I favor Indonesia in my recollection.”

(...)
About a year after discussing with Mary Ayers the foreign student she and her husband were supporting, Hulton recalls meeting a young black male on the sidewalk in front of the Ayers home.

Hulton describes the man as being in his early 20s, noting that he was tall, thin, had a light complexion and that his ears stuck out.

“He greeted me,” Hulton says. “He was very polite, dressed nicely, but informally – slacks and a dress shirt – and he spoke with no accent. Immediately this young black man entered into conversation with me. He told me he had taken the train out from Chicago and had come to thank the Ayers family personally for having helped him with his education.”

Hulton remembers asking the young man what his plans were for the future.

“He looked right at me and told me he was going to be president of the United States,” Hulton says.

“There was a little bit of a grin on his face when he said it – he sounded sure of himself, but not arrogant. I know how people will say things because they have an ambition, but it did not come across that way,” Hulton says. “It came across as if this young black male was telling me he was going to be president, almost as if it were the statement of a scientific fact that had already been determined, as if his being president had been already pre-arranged.”

“I kind of stuttered a response and said that nowadays anything is possible. I wished him good luck with his ambition,” he says.

“I remembered the conversation I had with Mary, and I associated this young man with the foreign student she had discussed with me, because Mary said they were supporting this foreign student, and the young black man I met outside the Ayers’ home said he had come to Glen Ellyn to thank the Ayers in person for helping him with his education.”

During the 2008 presidential campaign, Hulton observed several news reports detailing the relationship between Obama and Bill Ayers, and he recalled the encounter with the young man in front of Tom and Mary Ayers’ home.

“The facial and physical characteristics, as well as candidate Obama’s voice, matched that of the young black male I met in front of the Ayers’ home,” Hulton says in the affidavit he signed Nov. 12, 2011, for Sheriff Arpaio’s Cold Case Posse investigation.

“I am positive that the black male I spoke with in front of the Ayers’ house that day was indeed a young Barack Obama.”

(...)
Hulton recalls that he had one conversation with Tom Ayers, who was retired as CEO and chairman of Commonwealth Edison, shortly after the Ayers family moved into their home in Glen Ellyn.

“He asked me how I liked my job, and he started into what seemed to me a Marxist viewpoint on what it is like for the working man, trying to convince me that working people like me were exploited by their employers,” Hulton remembers of the conversation.

“As an American citizen, I appreciated everything I had, and I was not at war with people who had more than I had,” he says. “It surprised me to hear somebody who had been president of Consolidated Edison talking in these terms.”

Hulton says he got the feeling that Tom Ayers thought he knew more about the plight of the workingman and than he did.

Read the whole thing here.

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