Thursday, April 15, 2010

It Came From Below

Beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier, a huge volcanic eruption is belching smoke, gas, and ash into the sky creating large no-fly zone over parts of northern Europe that could continue for months. Two centuries ago, the same volcano erupted continuously for six months. There's no way to predict how long the volcano will spew gas and ash into the atmosphere.

The exceptionally explosive eruption was because the volcano lies under the glacier. When the super heated gasses and lava hit the glacier, the ice immediately and explosively vaporized blasting tons of rocks and fine mineral ash into the sky. When this material is sucked into jet engines, the engines clog and freeze-up, the airplane falls from the sky, and that's not good.


You Tube

In the distant future, we will be able to predict volcanic eruption and mitigate against the damaging effects. And Iceland will give pronounceable names to their glaciers, too.




The life of Indigo Red is full of adventure. Tune in next time for the Further Adventures of Indigo Red.

9 comments:

Louise said...

LOL! According to a commenter at Small Dead Animals, it's pronounced thus:

"Aye, a feckin joker

except you say yoker to sound Icelandic.

Say feckin as if you are vomiting herring."

Indigo Red said...

...vomitting herring! I've done that!

Anonymous said...

How many people realize this was caused by global warming? Don

Indigo Red said...

Probably a whole bunch, Don. There's a theory that volcanoes under glaciers are heating the ice from below, causing the glaciers to flow to the sea where they calve, fall into the oceans, frightening small children and Liberals.

Louise said...

"and Liberals."

And the science is settled on that one.

Anonymous said...

After dropping a tray of ice cubes on my toe this morning, I totally understand their fear. Don

Indigo Red said...

Well, Don, did Al Gore show up driving a toe truck?

Anonymous said...

Indi, that is just sick!!!! Don

Indigo Red said...

Yeah... I know. (sigh)