Thursday, July 03, 2008

The Declaration of Independence Debate

... if Barack Obama had been there.







IBD, Mike Ramirez

The life of Indigo Red is full of adventure. Tune in next time for the Further Adventures of Indigo Red.

10 comments:

The Griper said...

you know what gets me to griping? it is the fact that the libs just haven't learned anything from history. the tax issue was one of the primary reasons for our Revolution. its as if they keep trying our patience.

Indigo Red said...

They can't learn mmuch from history because they don't read it. If they did, they'd read themselves Left to Right and there'd be no more problem.

Gayle said...

You're absolutely right, Indigo, and so is this cartoon. It's the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth!

todd said...

I was going through some old letters and documents yesterday and I came across something I didn’t know. An ancestor of mine was a Captain in the Continental Army. He was the son of a British Army Sergeant that’s a part I had overlooked. Anyway, I thought it was interesting, the drastic change in loyalties that occurred I'm sure he wasn’t the only one who’s history was similar.

Indigo Red said...

It's always fun, I think, to find out something about our own family's history. And then to discover we have some connection to something important rerally can impart a true feeling of belonging and ownership.

My mother's maiden name is Dickinson. A man by that name signed the D. of Independence, but I've no clue if we are related. However, her mother's maiden name was Black. Grandmother's cousin was Hugo Black, US Supreme Court Justice.

Ancestors fought for the Union and the Confederacy, were abolishionists and slaveholders, criminals and lawmen. A great-uncle led a posse chasing Jesse James from Arkansas and into Missouri.

A Captain in the Continental Army - now that's really keen!

todd said...

That’s pretty darn interesting. Yes we were on both sides of the Civil War too. One you have heard about a Southern Cross winner who fell at Gettysburg, shot on the second laid there till the fourth when union soldiers eventually found him, his brother was not so lucky. Later as he had only one leg and if I am any measure of him was probably a real pain in the butt he was set free in a prisoner swap. The other was a Kansas volunteer that joined at the beginning, my documents say he joined as a young brown haired man, came home afterward sporting a headful of gray hair. I’m also a descendant of Pres. Polk, not exactly Washington but he’ll do. The Kansan was also a wagon trainer who encountered, wait for it, Indians. And you know the interesting part is they made friends with each other, no scalping involved. There’s more much more, my mothers maiden name was Bardwell, Sir Willem De Berdwelle. There’s a stained glass window somewhere in England that portrays a likeness of him. Since we live so close together we should get together sometime and trade stories, pictures, etc.

Indigo Red said...

Really? Are you of the Beardwells (damned Normans!) of Suffolk and Sussex Counties?

Mine were humble Saxons. And Celts up near Loch Ness.

Indigo Red said...

Oops, forgot. Sure, drop a line at indigored@sbcglobal.net and we can arrange something.

todd said...

I'm not exactly sure about that, probably though, I'll do some research. I can’t tell you my last name here but rest assured it is original old Celtic with lots of variations. You'd know it the minute you heard it.

todd said...

Ok, will do.