Sunday, June 01, 2008

Gasoline - Yesterday and Today

Fuel costs 1930

Fuel costs 2007



The life of Indigo Red is full of adventure. Tune in next time for the Further Adventures of Indigo Red.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Good topic, Indigo. There doesn't appear to be an end in sight either. Pretty soon the number one reason for not making it to work is because you couldn't afford to put gas in your vehicle. The cost of living is ridiciously high and now with sending US jobs to 3rd world countries and leaving US citizens unemployed is completely un-american!

American Patriot said...

Stupid libtard enviros.

Indigo Red said...

That's kinda the way I see it, too. The company I work for is sending much of our work to Taiwan and is thinking about India now. I suppose soon enough the US will be a 3rd world country and we can have our jobs back.

Indigo Red said...

AP, there is an upside to the enviro induced mess. While the Arabs use up their oil supply selling it to the US, our oil stays in the ground waiting for that happy day when the Arabs have nothing left and we have everything again. Including the jobs.

Gayle said...

"Stupid libtard enviros." LOL! I can't say it any better than American Patriot did.

dcat said...

yeah and the gas tax on top of all of that!

Get that drill going for Alaska!

Indigo Red said...

As far as the price goes, the enviros don't bother me so much. They're only preventing the drilling of new wells and building more refineries. I'm not paying them.

I am paying the government taxes enacted primarily by liberal Democrats who have yet to give me services of equal value.

bernie said...

If the US taxed gasoline as the Europeans do, then gas would be more than 8 bucks a gallon. I wish it were 10 bucks a gallon. I have a daughter-in-law that wasted gasoline getting to work, now she's taking the bus, as most of us really should.

With a 6 buck a gallon tax the feds would have enough energy money to finance the economical conversion of horse manure to gasoline. Horse manure, for those too callow to know, is in great supply in Washington, D.C.

Indigo Red said...

I agree, Bernie, that we should be using the bus, especially those of us in cities. However, in my area, it is still cheaper for me to drive. Metro busses cost more than gasoline. I can drive to and from work for two and a half days for the round trip cost of the bus for one day.

Plus the time I save is enormous. Auto drive time is about 15 minutes each way, while the bus ride is nearly 2 hours and two busses (no transfer tickets anymore, each bus is $2.) I live ony 8 miles from work.

A benefit of the higher gas prices is fewer illegals with uninsured cars are on the roads. The freeways are nearly empty nullifying the need to build more lanes and new roads.

If only we could harness the methane coming out of Wash.D.C. ...

Gayle said...

"If only we could harness the methane coming out of Wash.D.C. ..." What a great idea, Indigo! LOL! There's got to be enough of it to run this country for at least a decade! :)

Norm said...

My best guess is that the car in the background is a 38 Chevrolet...
Meanwhile, I was born in 1940 and can remember my dad taking us for a ride in his 36 Chevy (around 1948 or 49). He would stop by the corner gas station and have the attendant put in one-dollar's worth of gas for 15 cents per gallon. For that one dollar, he also had the oil and water checked and got all the windows washed.
Later when I entered the service in Novemebr of 1961 gasoline was 17 cents per gallon in Taunton, Massachusetts and when I arrived in San Antonio, Texas it was 19 cents per gallon

Indigo Red said...

That's interesting, Norm.

I recall my father getting wooden nickels as change from the Flying A station. The high school kid would come out wearing a white shirt and rag stuffed in the back pocket of his Levis. He'd say, 'Fill 'er up, sir? Can I check under the hood for ya?' Then he'd come back with the dipstick and say, 'Looks like you're down a quart.' Dad would say, "Yeah, put a quart in." And the sweet fumes of cancer causing leaded gasoline wafted into the car filled with children.

When I was in college in 1977, I was poor like most college students. I was always running on fumes. All I had in my pocket was a Kennedy head half-dollar and I needed to get to work. I bought one gallon that took me to work and payday three days later.

I have seen gas go from .25 cents a gal as a kid to $4.19 a gal today a 4:30PM. Yesterday at 4:30, it was $4.13. The price increased more in 24 hours than it had in my first 24 years.

My grandmother went from horsedrawn buggies to space shuttles over her 102 years. Things are changing at a far more rapid pace that it's hard to keep up anymore. I'm not so sure I want to anymore.